Our Vision – A World Free Of Sepsis

Sepsis is the final common pathway to death from most infectious diseases worldwide.

It arises when the body’s response to an infection injures its own tissues and organs. Sepsis follows a unique and time-critical clinical course, which in the early stages is highly amenable to treatment through early diagnosis and timely and appropriate clinical management. Currently, sepsis continues to cause approximately between six and nine million deaths worldwide every year, most of which are preventable. Many surviving patients suffer from the consequences for the rest of their lives.

Most types of microorganisms can cause sepsis, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites. However, it may also be caused by infections with seasonal influenza viruses, dengue viruses, and highly transmissible pathogens of public health concern; such as avian and swine influenza viruses, Ebola, and yellow fever viruses.

Sepsis is a major cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality in low- and middle-income countries and affects millions of hospitalized patients in high-income countries. 

In the community, sepsis often presents as the clinical deterioration of common and preventable infections such as those of the respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary tract, or of wounds and skin. Sepsis is frequently under-diagnosed at an early stage - when it still is potentially reversible.

World Sepsis Day was initiated by the Global Sepsis Alliance in 2012 with the aim to raise awareness for sepsis worldwide.

 
Prevent Sepsis

Prevent Sepsis

Sepsis FAQ

Sepsis FAQ

Treat Sepsis

Treat Sepsis