Stories of Sepsis - Shared by Survivors and Those Bereaved by Sepsis

This page is dedicated to the survivors of sepsis and those who lost a loved one due to sepsis. We thank them so much for sharing their very personal encounter with sepsis with all of us and for supporting World Sepsis Day and the global fight against sepsis. If you would like to share your story, please get in touch.

 

Fiona Gray

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In the early hours of July 12th, 2015, I was settling our daughter after she’d woken. As I left her room I banged my elbow quite hard but gave it a rub and went back to bed. An hour or so later, I awoke to golf ball size swelling on my elbow and extreme pain but no wound. Within two hours I was shivering uncontrollably and rocking back and forth screaming for my husband to take me to hospital. It was very early on a Sunday morning and my husband was barely awake as he got our ten-month-old daughter ready and helped me dress. I felt sicker than I’d ever felt before...

 

Sonia Adrissi

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I had picked my daughter up from school and the pain had slowly worsened throughout the afternoon. I’d been invited to lunch with a new friend and I just couldn’t sit comfortably thinking I must have hurt my back due to the sudden, uncomfortable back pain. Arriving home with my daughter, I was overtaken by an overwhelming feeling of being so very unwell, feverish and struggling to function.  I had to lay down, thinking if I did I would feel better, leaving my daughter doing her schoolwork after I had attempted to prepare a quick dinner for her (and subsequently burning it!) and as the evening progressed, I eventually realized that I seriously needed to get help as I lay there in bed shivering violently...

 

Maddy Jones

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On a Thursday afternoon, after spending a few days on the Sunshine Coast with her boyfriend and his family, she came home feeling quite ill and told us that she felt like she was getting the flu. Her Step Mum, promptly gave her some Ibuprofen and water and told her to rest.

Maddy’s Dad took her to a GP the following morning (Friday). She was diagnosed with a respiratory infection and told to keep her fluids up, take over the counter cold and flu medication and rest. The next day, Saturday evening, Maddy was feeling worse, she was complaining that she was short of breath, so her Mother took her to the hospital where she was told she was dehydrated, given fluids, and sent home to rest...

 

Thomas Gatley

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The evening before this catastrophic event, Tom did seem a little ratty and restless. He played a little on the kitchen counter next to me as I cooked supper and seemed to take an enjoyment in throwing pieces of dried spaghetti on the floor and waiting to see my reaction.  He did not want to eat, as much as we tried to encourage him.  He seemed clumsy almost, he hit his head on the dinner table as he struggled to get off my knee.

“He’s coming down with something”, we thought. “Either that or he’s teething”. He settled down to bed with a bottle and a cuddle. There was no fever at that point in the evening. No other signs of anything being seriously wrong. It was after midnight that he awoke with a raging temperature and I was ready for it with suppositories and neurofen...

 

Sue & Jay Stull

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After a family day that included the movies, dinner, and frozen yogurt, Sue started feeling ill with fever and chills and overall body pain, primarily in her neck and throat. Since her symptoms hadn’t subsided, we went to the emergency room in the very early morning hours of August 8th.

On this initial visit to the ER, Sue presented with a high heart rate, low blood pressure, low urine output, slight dehydration, and rated her pain a 9 out of 10. She was tested for strep throat and when the rapid strep test came back negative, the ER doctor diagnosed her with a viral infection, said she would feel worse before she felt better, and prescribed cough syrup with codeine. We didn’t know it at the time, but Sue’s vital signs were critical red flags that she was very ill, but the doctor failed to recognize and act on them...

 

Mac Horsburgh

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In April 2016, I had a life threatening and life changing experience as a result of an infection in my index finger. One week previously I had seen a physician who diagnosed a Cellulitis infection on my finger and prescribed an antibiotic to treat it. Unfortunately for me, this physician did not give me any information about what I should do if the antibiotic he prescribed was not successful in treating this infection. To make a long story short a week later I collapsed at home and was rushed to the hospital with a ruptured abdominal aneurysm and in septic shock. I survived an event with a higher than 90% fatality rate...

 

More stories are coming soon - we expect to publish a new one every 4 to 6 weeks. After all, there are plenty to choose from, with more being 'created' every day than we could ever share. If you want to share your personal sepsis story, please get in touch

The Global Sepsis Alliance, initiator of World Sepsis Day and World Sepsis Congress, continues to being commited to raise awareness of sepsis worldwide, as well as to work with international stakeholders to implement the demands of the WHO Resolution on Sepsis. For that, we depend on your support - you can help make a difference!

 

What Is Sepsis?

Sepsis is the final common pathway to death from most infectious diseases worldwide. It affects 30 million people worldwide every year, 6 to 9 million die. Many surviving patients suffer from the consequences for the rest of their lives. For World Sepsis Day 2017, we made a short video explaining sepsis in 3 minutes, including sepsis signs, symptoms, consequences, risk groups, and how it can be prevented.

Besides English, this video is also available in SpanishItalian, and German (YouTube links). French, Portuguese and Turkish are coming soon.

 

Learn Even More About Sepsis

  Prevent Sepsis

Prevent Sepsis

  Sepsis FAQ

Sepsis FAQ

  Treat Sepsis

Treat Sepsis